Instructors

Instructors preliminary list:

Rob Runacres: Workshop title to be confirmed
Karin Verelst: Working with the Female Body in HEMA
Gilles Martinez: Workshop title to be confirmed
Martin Enzi: The underestimated second weapon in Messerfencing – the left hand
Aurélien Calonne: Workshop title to be confirmed
Tea Kew: Learning to Train
Christian Stickel: Basic principles of Dussack fighting according to Paulus Hector Mair’s Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica
Predrag Nikolic: Workshop title to be confirmed
George Livermore: Workshop title to be confirmed
Thomas Bögle: Use the Meisterhaw and win – but how to do it?
Jens Peter Kleinau: Tanz den Liechtenauer – The Five Rules of Footwork
Marine Beaumel: Use your bloody buckler, I.33 style
Ties Kool: How to close the gap between technical training and sparring
Mathieu Cottereau: Missing an assault
Gauthier Petit-Chantalat: The art of not killing
Stefan Dieke: Schnappen – the signature move of Joachim Meyer’s Rappier
Shanee Nishry: Disarming the Buffalo Trap
Marc Dekker: The farmers scythe as a weapon
Willeke Snijder: Introduction to Sickle fighting by Paulus Hector Mair
Sam Brennan Booth: Control of space, control of our opponent, & control of ourselves
Cor Kronenburg: Würgegriff und Mordschlag
Antoine Coudre: Workshop title to be confirmed
Jack Gassman: Scenario games to explore techniques and mindset from Fiore dei Liberi Lichtenauer’s Zettel
Jack Gassman: Lichtenauer’s Zettel
Romain Figliuzzi: Armored techniques of the Italian tradition
Julien Vuagniaux: Workshop title to be confirmed
Thomas McConnell: Workshop title to be confirmed
Jean-Pascal Esparceil and Julien Garry: French Cavalry Sword Exercise, Saumur 1824
Jay Maxwell: From Cut to Thrust – the transitional blade
Jay Maxwell: The Close Play – Grips, Trips & Dirty Tricks
Colin Richards: Using stepping angles to reach safe zones
George Zacharopoulos: Body mechanics, footwork, guards of the Italian rapier
Michel Rensen: Armchair swordfighters – Coaching for HEMA
And more !

Instructor and class details:

George ZACHAROPOULOS
Academy of Hoplomachia
Hellenic Federation of Historical European Martial Arts (HFHEMA)
Greece
Biography
George Zacharopoulos is studying and training in Historical European Martial Arts for more than a decade with a fondness for the German longsword and a likeness for the Italian and Spanish rapier. He is currently teaching HEMA at S.C. Academy of Hoplomachia, Marxbrüder Guild Hellas and Coriolanos HEMA Team. Provost of the HISTORICAL FENCING AFFILIATES and founder of the Athens Bartitsu Club 1900. Previous experience includes Ninjutsu, Combined Chinese and Filipino Boxing (by Angelos Fasois), Sport Fencing, Sport Archery. Also certified Knife Instructor of the Reality Based Personal Protection system by Jim Wagner. He has participated in HEMA events and taught workshops in Greece and abroad. Co-author (with Chrysovalantis Tampakakis) of the first book for HEMA in Greek, entitled “The Knightly art of the Sword” by Batsioulas Publications in 2011. His new book, a translation in English of Philipp Müller’s “Theoretical and Applied introduction to Swordmanship” (ΘΕΩΡΗΤΙΚΗ ΚΑΙ ΠΡΑΚΤΙΚΗ ΕΙΣΗΓΗΣΙΣ ΤΗΣ ΣΠΑΘΑΣΚΙΑΣ) 1847 military sabre treatise is out by Fallen Rook Publishing. Member of HEMAC and THE HEMA ALLIANCE. General Secretary of the Hellenic Federation of Historical European Martial Arts.
Workshop
Body mechanics, footwork, guards of the Italian rapier
In this workshop we will work a little bit on the basics – body mechanics, footwork, guards- of the Italian rapier fighting using as a guide the teachings of the Venetian maestro Nicoletto Giganti as laid out in his treatise “Scola, overo, teatro….” (1606) but we will focus more on various suggestions – diverse (artful) parries and counters, defense against cuts, close distance techniques (coming to grips) etc- from his “lost second book” published in 1608. Time permitted we may see a couple of his rapier & dagger plays.
Level: Beginner+/Intermediate
Required gear: Fencing mask, light gloves, chest protection, rapier (dagger optional)
Source(s):

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Colin RICHARDS
Arts of Mars Academy
HEMAC
Germany
Biography
British living in Germany with a HEMA school with over 40 students. With 38 years experience in teaching and doing martial arts. He has conducted original research in many treatises including Fiore, Ringeck, I.33 and into the use of Viking weapons. His current research is on movement in combat in the early treatises.
Atelier
Using stepping angles to reach safe zones
This workshop explores the concept of using stepping angles which lead to safe zones where the opponent cannot hit the player, coupled with the use of the opponents tempo to achieve the maximum amount of safety in the maneuver. Footwork is used in the Tactical sense in order to out maneuver the opponent thereby increasing the chance of defeating them. This workshop works with any weapon though will be oriented on German and Italian Longsword or Arming sword, though Langesmesser can also be used. The workshop uses German and Italian Longsword research to reconstruct possible and viable combat movement. The workshop presents a plausible explanation of “Frequens Motens” and how it works in combat. The aim is to improve the knowledge and use of footwork in HEMA combat. This workshop is open to beginner and advanced alike, though a good knowledge of stepping would be an advantage.
Level: Beginner to instructor
Required gear: Recommended
Source(s): Arts of Mars

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Michel RENSEN
Zwaard & Steen
H.E.M.A.-bond Nederland
The Netherlands
Biography
Michel Rensen started training at Zwaard & Steen in 2013, and little more than a year later he started the process to become a trainer at the club. He became a trainer about a year after that, and by now he teaches at the club’s Rotterdam branch every week. He’s also involved in co-writing the club’s lesson plans. Besides teaching at Zwaard & Steen, he also regularly gives workshops, both in the Netherlands and other countries. He also often competes in tournaments.
Workshop
Armchair swordfighters – Coaching for HEMA
In HEMA tournaments, you can see an increasing number of fighters being supported by a coach in their corner, who are there to provide quick and concise feedback on technique or to regulate the fighter’s mood (calm them down or fire them up). As a fighter, having a coach in your corner can be a tremendous help as it allows you to focus on the fight a lot more.
However, this type of coaching can also be helpful to those who don’t (plan to) participate in tournaments at all. After all, the coach can look at the fight from a detached perspective and provide useful feedback about errors that neither fighter might be aware of. Of course, for this to work, the coach needs to be well-trained in observing fights and identifying areas of improvement.
In this workshop, we will be looking into the role of the coach, and practice for that role by means of various sparring exercises, designed to let the coach practice observing, diagnosing and solving problems in a concise manner.
Level: This workshop is open for participants at any skill level
Required gear: DBecause of the setup of this workshop, we are going to need roughly the same amount of fighters as we need coaches. It is possible to change roles in-between exercises. If you plan on just coaching, you will need at least a sword and mask. For fighters, it is recommended to bring full sparring gear, but you will at the very least need a mask (with back of head protection), a gorget, a chestplate, gloves, elbow protection and a sword. This workshop is mainly focused on longsword, but it is possible to participate with other weapons, as long as you have an opponent with the same weapon.
Source(s):

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Romain FIGLIUZZI
Medieval Combat
FFAMHE
France
Biography
I have been interested in the medieval period from an early age and i started training myself in European Martial Arts in 2012 at Medieval Combat. I became in 2015, member of the Harnischfechten Ring, a european groupe for exchange and practice around armored combat sources.
Since 2017, I am also, president and instructor about armored and hasts weapon at Medieval Combat.
Workshop
Armored techniques of the Italian tradition
The workshop will focus exclusively on the armored techniques of the Italian tradition through the practice of corresponding sources available in the manuscripts of Fiore Dei Liberi. We will mainly study the games presented in the sections concerning the half-sword, the axe, their similarities and some entries in wrestling.
Level: Intermediate
Required gear: MMinimal : HEMA gloves, helmet, vest and sword.
Recommended : Full armor, sword and axe.
Source(s): Fiore Dei Liberi sources about half-sword and axe sections, translated by Benjamin Conan available on De Taille et d’Estoc

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Stefan DIEKE
Alte Kampfkunst
N/A
Germany
Biography
Stefan is a german HEMA pioneer and works as a professional HEMA instructor. He runs ‘Alte Kampfkunst‘, a fulltime HEMA-school located in Wuppertal, Germany. There he teaches Sabre, Longsword and Bartitsu / Cane as regular classes and gives seminars in these and some other historical weapons, like rapier, staff and dagger.
Besides giving seminars internationaly, he taught at a number of the most prestigiuos HEMA events worldwide, like WMAW, ISMAC, SWASH, the Dreynevent, the Australian Historical Swordplay Conferencen, the Paddy Crean Workshop, Dijon …
Having been member of several HEMA organizations his motto finally is ‘No politics – just swordsmanship’.
Workshop
Schnappen – the signature move of Joachim Meyer’s Rappier
In his book on the fighting arts of the time (1570), Joachim Meyer gives a thorough description of cut & thrust fencing with a sword which he called ‘Rappier’ in contemporary german. In modern english we would call this kind of sword a sidesword.
This fighting system makes about equal use of cuts and thrusts, which means that there also have to be transitions from cuts into thrusts, from thrusts into thrusts and of course from parries into thrusts. Meyer accomplishes this by a set of motions which he calls ‘schnappen’. In this class we will explore these flicks of the wrist which permit to keep the sword in motion and thus keep or gain the ‘vor’ and also allows a quick parry if need should be.
Level: Beginner
Required gear: Straight bladed sword with the tip being either rolled, flattened or covered; fencing mask. Highly recommended: gloves
Source(s): Joachim Meyer

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Christian STICKEL
Solve et Coagula e.V.
DDHF
Germany
Biography
Christian Stickel began his journey into martial arts and knighthood as a kid and ever since explored different systems of weaponless and weapon based fighting styles. As part of the European reenactment movement he has done things with swords for the last 25 years. For the past five years he has been teaching HEMA classes three times a week as part of the university sports program in Fulda/Germany and has given workshops at several events. His preferred weapons are sword & buckler, dussack and half staff, according to the sources MS I.33 and MSS Dresd.C.93/C.94.
Workshop
Basic principles of Dussack fighting according to Paulus Hector Mair’s Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica
The participants of the workshop will get to know basic principles of Dussack fighting according to Paulus Hector Mair’s Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (MSS Dresd.C.93/C.94). We will train some usefull grips, stances, body mechanics, distance and attack patterns. The main source for this workshop is not only the 40 comprehensive Dussack plays, but also Mair’s appendix « The book pertinent to the dusseggen », which is basically an excerpt from Lecküchners Manuscript on the Messer. The goal of this workshop is also to rise the recognition of the Dussack as a training tool for certain movements and strategies that can be applied to other weapons.
Let’s make dusseggen great again!
Level: Beginner/Intermediate
Required gear: Light gloves, mask. Leather or wooden dussack if you have one, I will bring along 20 of mine.
Source(s): MSS Dresd.C.93/C.94.

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Jack GASSMAN
Artes Certaminis
SwissHEMA
Switzerland
Biography
Jack Gassmann started HEMA at 13 and has been studying ever since, publishing research articles and presenting at academic conferences as well as placing in international tournaments and teaching workshops. His Teaching focuses on building biomechanics and games for developing tactics and strategy in fun dynamic way.
Workshop
Scenario games to explore techniques and mindset from Fiore dei Liberi
As Giganti was to write a hundred years later, italy’s captains were at far greater risk of death by the dagger than the sword.
Assassination was an ever present threat to the condottieri captains, courtiers and positions that made up Fiore’s students and it is clear from abundance of improvised weapons that make up his treatises, but even more understanding how this colors his system is fundamental to applying his techniques.
In this workshop we’ll be using Scenario games to explore his techniques and mindset working from chronicle and historical accounts to add background to the games.
Level: Basic Sparring, Sparring experience
Required gear: Mask and throat protection, light gloves and jacket recommended
Source(s): Fiore dei Liberi

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Jack GASSMAN
Artes Certaminis
SwissHEMA
Switzerland
Biography
Jack Gassmann started HEMA at 13 and has been studying ever since, publishing research articles and presenting at academic conferences as well as placing in international tournaments and teaching workshops. His Teaching focuses on building biomechanics and games for developing tactics and strategy in fun dynamic way.
Workshop
Lichtenauer’s Zettel
Lichtenauer’s Zettel with it’s trifecta of Blossfechten, Rossfechten and Harnessfechten was, whether nobility, mercenary or city Konstaffler aimed at medieval cavalry and it’s unique duties. We will be working hands on from period accounts to reconstruct the kinds of challenges that the people practicing these arts would have been facing and gain insights into why the early Lichtenauer system is the way it is.
The class will be working directly from period narrative sources on medieval warfare for sparring games that recreate the challenges faced by fighters who would have been practicing Lichtenauer’s art.
Level: Basic Sparring Sparring experience
Required gear: Basic Sparring gear preferable, Minimum: mask, gloves, throat protection
Source(s): Lichtenauer

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Mark DEKKER
Bataille
H.E.M.A
Netherlands
Biography
Marc started his career in HEMA in 2007. Since then he has been learning a width range of HEMA weapons and techniques. He has been sharing this knowledge and has being using it to perform in shows and movies. In 2012 he started researching the scythe fighting techniques as described by Paulus Hector Mair. Marc is currently one of the trainers at Bataille and functions as a fight choreographer for shows.
Workshop
The farmers scythe as a weapon
We will dive into the pages of the Arte Atletica of Paules Hector Mair and practice the techniques from the 10 pages dedicated to the farmers scythe. In the first part we run to the stances and techniques from various pages from the Arte Atletica. In the second part we will facilitate the participants to experiment with the farmers scythe as a weapon. This will allow participant to either experiment with pages from the Arte Atletica that have not been covered or work on counters and variations of pages covered in the first part.
Level: Beginner
Required gear: Recommended: Gloves, Optional: Fencing mask
Source(s): De Arte Athletica by Paulus Hector Mair

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Thomas BOGLE
Freyfechter Augustini
DDHF, IFHEMA
Germany
Biography
Thomas Boegle has trained Longsword since 2010 and in 2012 first participated in an international tournament. Since then, he has regularly fought in local as well as international tournaments. In the summer of 2015 he was elected Vice President of DDHF (German HEMA Federation), with the responsibilities: Sport, Sport Development and Tournament beings. In 2017 and 2018 he was part of the organization team for the biggest German HEMA event, responsible for the tournament.
Workshop
Use the Meisterhaw and win – but how to do it?
The workshop will focus on the topic how a Meisterhau can be transferred from technique to free sparring and why it sometimes do not work. We will discuss the reasons leading to the failure of the technique and show practical examples and exercises how technique can specifically be transmitted into sparring and how they can be applied there. The workshop is aimed primarily at beginners and experienced students who started sparring or want to improve their performance. For experienced fighters it might be a new approach and as well set new training incentives. Minimal equipment consisting of: gloves, neck protection and mask.
Level: Beginners and intermediate in sparring. Intermediate HEMA experience required.
Required gear: Minimum: Mask, throat protection and gloves
Source(s): Techniques from Lichtenauer

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Jean-Pascal ESPARCEIL, Julien GARRY
France
Biography
Jean-Pascal Esparceil began studying HEMA in 2005. He is focusing on sword and buckler according to MS I33.
As a military history researcher with the French Armed Forces Joint Historical Service since 2012, he enjoys easy access to the documents and the weapons having been used by the French Military, while having for neighbour the last mounted cavalry unit in France. This decided him to delve into cavalry cold weapons use from the beginning of the 19th Century to the Great War.
He has taught a workshop on the same topic at EHAMAG 2017.
Workshop
French Cavalry Sword Exercise, Saumur 1824
This workshop will be a 19th Century experience: participants will learn the techniques while experiencing the teaching methods described in the regulations and handling the regulations swords in use between 1822 and 1882. Mounted sword combat includes opposing various kinds of adversaries armed themselves with different offensive and defensive weapons; combat against bayonet armed infantrymen will be simulated.
The workshop is based on French regulations on Cavalry training equivalent to Cavalry Sword Exercise pamphlets of the British or US Army, from « Escrime à cheval » written in 1824, published in 1828, to « Règlement provisoire sur les exercices de la cavalerie 1873 », and some works published by and for instructors.
The workshop will follow (that is the initial plan, anyway) the structure of the Fourth Lesson for Dismounted Training, First Part, Sword Exercise, of the 1929 regulation.
A print of the sources (text and images) of techniques taught during the workshop will be given to everyone sharing the 1824.
Level: Beginners
Required gear: Fencing mask will be mandatory, a thin glove is strongly advised, as a string 60 cm (24 inches) long that will be used as a sword knot.
A dozen regulation Light Cavalry sabers (cavalry was light, sabers were not) in use during the 19th Century will be available. You might want to bring a light training implement. As following period practice, simulators for horses and bayonet will be provided.
Source(s): « Escrime à cheval », « Règlement provisoire sur les exercices de la cavalerie 1873 », etc.

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Karin VERELST
SwArta/Free Scholar
SBSN (Belgian Federation) + IFHEMA
Belgium
Biography
Karin Verelst practices HEMA since a decennium and martial arts since twenty years. She trains with the well-known Belgian group SwArta, and co-founded the Brussels group Via Bruxellensis. She moreover is co-founder and acted as founding president of the Belgian HEMA-Federation SBSN. Karin’s main practice focus is on longsword, ringen and dagger (Liechtenauer and Fiore), altough she broadened her interest to Destreza rapier and Messer over the past few years. Other favourites of hers are Jogo do Pau and Glima. She participates regularly in international competitions and other HEMA-related international events, and recently found her way into the international instructors’ circuit, with a much appreciated seminar on Fiore’s Bastoncello in Dijon (FR), Tomar (PRT) and Tilburg (NL). Her further martial experience includes Olympic boxing, Tai Jutsu and Shaolin Kung Fu. In this latter discipline, she followed an intense stage in the Kunyu Shan Mountain Traditional Martial Arts Academy, at Shandong Province, China, summer 2015, crowned with a succesful public exam. She moreover acquired the basic professional qualification of the British Academy of Dramatic Combat (BADC) in 2016. Finally, Karin is active as a researcher and scholar in HEMA-Studies. She published (together with Daniel Jaquet and Timothy Dawson) a scholarly reference work, Late Medieval and Early Modern Fight Books — Tradition and Transmission of Martial Arts in Europe, published by Brill, in 2016. As a NIAS-fellow, she presented the fine fleur of international humanities scholars with their first encounter with this exciting new field, and was invited to the Studium Generale of Groningen University to speak about “Martial art as art of Life” in 2017. She is preparing various articles, and cherishes the not-so-secret ambition to publish a critical edition of ‘Archetype L’, the presumed original of Liechtenauer’s Zedel somewhere over the coming years.
Workshop
Working with the Female Body in HEMA
The starting point of this workshop is the idea that talk about the (real or supposed) a priori biological differences between men and women (which in the end always come down to some kind of physical inferiority of the latter) hampers the development of female fighters in HEMA. There is no such thing as “female muscles” in biology. And for 80% of the individuals within the normal distribution of factors like length and body weight, numbers fall within a range where individual differences often matter more than the overall gendered mean, especially in a context where weapons at least partially equalise.
Given this state of affairs, the working principle should be that women dedicated to train accordingly can do everything in HEMA on the same level as men. This, however, does not imply that women do not face specific physical and mental problems when, or — even more importantly — before entering the arena. To a large extend these are cultural in origin, but their physical mpact may be very, very real. From birth on women are trained to lack self-confidence and to expect less. The idea that “you cannot because you are not” comes down to an internalised “you’re not supposed to” from an extremely early age. Ideas and expectations with respect to behaviour shape things like body pose, knee position, shoulder strength, and the mental incapacity to strike back when stricken at to a surprising degree. The good news is that remedies exist, even if not miracles. It is the goal of this workshop to make HEMA practitioners and trainers (male and female) aware of these problems and provide tools to tackle them in a hands on, practical manner, within the context of a normal training setting. This has a liberating effect, not ony on the women, but also on the men on the training ground.
The operational philosophy behind my approach is that you can fight only if you can fight (in principle) everybody, with a reasonable chance of succes: you’re not learning “to fight like a man”, you’re learning to fight, point final. That is why I speak of “working with the female body”, rather than of “working with women” — I don’t believe there should be a separate HEMA for women, just as I don’t believe that separate schools for women would be the proper approach to women’s intellectual emancipation. I believe in a differentiated approach to tackle specific problems within the common HEMA-setting, especially with respect to the competitive aspect of HEMA. The basic idea is that the female body needs emancipation just as much as the female mind does.
Obviously, this workshop can only indicate; working on these topics in a lasting, succesful manner has to be seen in the context of the evolution of an individual’s development which can last over several years. But awareness of these things and the ability to communicate this awareness through training practices are an essential starting point.Overview:
1) Introduction & functional warm up:

Bodily awareness, gaining trust, dealing with gendered bodies in an ungendered way
Learning to fight: the ‘hit me in the stomach’-experiment
A short remark on welcoming women newbees in a mainly male environment2) Psychomechanics of combat:
Awakening your inner warrior and putting it to good use
Staring down an opponent
Imposing yourself — taking the space3) Adjusting (to) internal and external body architecture:
Hips and X-legs, and how to overcome them
Shoulders & breasts and other dangerous things
Aw, calves muscles!
The push up (and pull up) horror
You Can Not Grip, nor Shall You
Small & Tall, Long & Short4) Dealing with the risk of hurting each other:
Throws; hitting and hitting hard; punches to the chest; kicks to the groin

5) Taking the space, revisited
Application in sparring situations

6) Operational advice — feed back:
Thumb rules:
Stop apologising!
“Are you OK” is OK.
It always helps to talk, but not too much!

Level: Intermediate/Senior/Instructor (people with experience in training concepts)
Required gear: EBasic gear: mask, gloves, neck protection, sword. Cup for groin protection. Breastprotection for male and female if available.
Source(s): Given the nature of the subject, no specific sources are involved. But exercises will be based where possible on documented techniques and situations.

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Marine BEAUMEL
Tampere HEMA / Ost du Griffon Noir
Finland / France
Biography
I have always been practicing all kind of sports and different martial arts (savate, thai boxing, judo,…). I discovered HEMA in 2008 and joined the group in Toulouse (france) in 2010, where i’ve trained sword and buckler and then started teaching it. I have been an instructor for 5 years now. Nowadays, i am in Tampere (finland) where i co-founded a new group 4 years ago. I practice also langes messer, dagger and longsword. But my main focus is on 1.33.
Workshop
Use your bloody buckler, I.33 style
This workshop will focus on how to use the buckler as a more effective protection and weapon with simple exercises and free play. We will also work on the body stance/mechanic that goes with it.
We will see how to use the buckler in 3 type of situation/distance : Before entering the fight, binding distance and close distance/grappling. The buckler has different uses like catching blades, protecting hands and body, blurring the distance… The objective is to learn how to use all this at the same time and be effective in future fights. This also applies to mixed weapon fight.
The buckler is a real advantage, learn to use it !
Level: All levels welcome (basics in sword and buckler I.33 recommended)
Required gear: Mask, gloves, buckler and sword
Source(s): Royal armouries, Ms I.33

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Gautier PETIT-CHANTALAT
OGN Toulouse AMHE
FFAMHE / IFHEMA
France / Occitanie
Biography
JI’m a HEMA practitioner for 8 years and instructor for 6 year (Italian longsword and recently Spanish rapier). I did some workshops in some events (HEMAC Dijon 2015, AMHE Nantes 2014) and I was rewarded with the Prix Philippe Erard in 2014 by the FFAMHE. I did a translation of the Vadi and some articles you can read in the OGN Blog (called Le Sentiment du Fer)
Workshop
The art of not killing
In some sources, we can observe that some masters in arms did elaborate a system of fencing or a system of defence allowing them to save the life of their opponents. The questions we will pose in this lecture is why and how, and we will see that through three sources as examples : the longsword from Philippo Vadi’s Arte Gladiatoria Dimicandi, Joachim Meyer’s Kunst Des Fechtens and Francisco Lorenz de Rada’s Verdadera Destreza de las Armas. We will see each time how the historical and sociological context motivated them to create those special technic or martial art, and how they applicate this philosophy by differents point of views on their technics, and finally we will detect if there is a common pattern in their motivation and methods of work.
Level: Be able to understand a french trying to speak english.
Required gear: A chair
Source(s):
Philippo Vadi Pisano Arte Galadiatoria Dimicandi
Joachim Meyer Kunst Des Fechtens
Francisco Lorenz de Rada De la Verdadera Destreza de las Armas

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Jay MAXWELL
School of the Sword
HEMAC
UK
Biography
Jay Maxwell has been studying and practising historical martial arts since 2004. He has taught at high profile events across Europe, and has won or placed, in a range of international
tournaments.
Jay has recently focused his efforts on the transition between what is now called sidesword to rapier. This means looking at the technical change characterised by shorter-bladed rapiers, and understanding how these swords were used: the effectiveness of the cut in closing lines with tightly controlled offline motions, and invitational openings to chase down an opponent in close measure.
This process combined methods and counters from sources such as Lovino, Docciolini and Palladini; as well as more popular systems like Fabris and Capo Ferro.
Currently Jay is looking at the effect of northern Italian swordsmanship on the Germanic systems of the Holy Roman Empire before the outbreak of the Thirty Years’ War, and how these combined to create a characteristic style.
Areas of particular interest in the resulting system are reflected in the characteristic body mechanics, including a strong leaning of the head and torso to shift between defensive back-weighted and aggressive forward-weighted stances. On the attack this lends impetus as well as better protection when combined with voiding.
Many of these systems seem to be fairly cut-heavy and, based on analysis of the plates printed in the manuscripts, the blades tend to be fairly short. Interpreting the visual evidence of plates is, however, not straightforward. We need to consider the level of supervision the fencing master was able to exercise over the artist and engraver. Heussler, who had trained as a printer, included a large number of beautifully engraved plates in his book. He published it in his home town of Nürnberg, and production was carried out by the very printer with whom he had served his apprenticeship. For this reason, we can conclude that his plates are a good representation of his ideas about movement and equipment. Jay is now analysing works by Heussler, Köppen and Schöffer.
Part of this effort involves working with the de Walden Collection held at the Wallace Collection, and Jay is currently working on an English translation of Heussler.
Workshop
From Cut to Thrust – the transitional blade
Examining the less extensively documented sources from what is termed the transitional period of late sidesword and early rapier, this workshop is focused on examining the body and blade mechanics of the north Italian systems to optimise movement and posture using analysis of partner drills of increasing complexity. These partner drills are designed to improve speed, strength and efficiency as well as technical understanding, starting out simple and building in a manner that allows the combinations to be grasped even by beginners.
Level: Suitable for beginners
Required gear: Mask, gloves, sidesword or rapier (Jackets recommended)
Source(s): Lovino, Docciolini, Palladini, Fabris, Capo Ferro, Schöffer, Heussler, L’Ange.

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Jay MAXWELL
School of the Sword
HEMAC
UK
Biography
Jay Maxwell has been studying and practising historical martial arts since 2004. He has taught at high profile events across Europe, and has won or placed, in a range of international
tournaments.
Jay has recently focused his efforts on the transition between what is now called sidesword to rapier. This means looking at the technical change characterised by shorter-bladed rapiers, and understanding how these swords were used: the effectiveness of the cut in closing lines with tightly controlled offline motions, and invitational openings to chase down an opponent in close measure.
This process combined methods and counters from sources such as Lovino, Docciolini and Palladini; as well as more popular systems like Fabris and Capo Ferro.
Currently Jay is looking at the effect of northern Italian swordsmanship on the Germanic systems of the Holy Roman Empire before the outbreak of the Thirty Years’ War, and how these combined to create a characteristic style.
Areas of particular interest in the resulting system are reflected in the characteristic body mechanics, including a strong leaning of the head and torso to shift between defensive back-weighted and aggressive forward-weighted stances. On the attack this lends impetus as well as better protection when combined with voiding.
Many of these systems seem to be fairly cut-heavy and, based on analysis of the plates printed in the manuscripts, the blades tend to be fairly short. Interpreting the visual evidence of plates is, however, not straightforward. We need to consider the level of supervision the fencing master was able to exercise over the artist and engraver. Heussler, who had trained as a printer, included a large number of beautifully engraved plates in his book. He published it in his home town of Nürnberg, and production was carried out by the very printer with whom he had served his apprenticeship. For this reason, we can conclude that his plates are a good representation of his ideas about movement and equipment. Jay is now analysing works by Heussler, Köppen and Schöffer.
Part of this effort involves working with the de Walden Collection held at the Wallace Collection, and Jay is currently working on an English translation of Heussler.
Workshop
The Close Play – Grips, Trips & Dirty Tricks
Following on from the previous workshop, we shall be taking a look at the close play, using new sequences of shorter partner drills to build from initial engagement and closing, through the subtleties of misdirection, and on to the grips and grapples that can be used with the longer blade; as well as voids and counters to these same techniques. Care shall need to be taken during the exercises due to the nature of falls and throws, and demonstrated methods of falling safely and assisting the training partner must be observed.
Level: Suitable for beginners
Required gear: Mask, gloves, sidesword or rapier (Jackets recommended)
Source(s): Lovino, Docciolini, Palladini, Fabris, Capo Ferro, Schöffer, Heussler, L’Ange.

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Tea KEW
Cambridge HEMA
UK
Biography
I started historical fencing at Cambridge HEMA in late 2013 and have focused since the beginning on Ringeck’s longsword fencing. In 2017, I began to teach at external events around the UK, including Fightcamp. I also run the Illustrated Ringeck page, providing a photographic guide to the plays from his gloss.
Workshop
Learning to Train
It is very common for people to study techniques in simple drills and then struggle to apply them in free fencing. This workshop will look at how to train in order to bridge this gap, by teaching the play of ‘twer unter twer’ using drills drawn from Understanding Fencing. We will work through a series of intermediate exercises that progressively build the ability to recognise a situation, select an appropriate response and apply that response under pressure.
By the end of the class participants will be using the ‘twer unter twer’ in free fencing. More importantly, they will also have acquired a toolbox they can use for training other plays at their own clubs.
Level: Anyone who knows how to throw a twerhaw from each side is welcome. Be prepared to drill and sweat.
Required gear: Synthetic or steel longsword, good gloves, mask and back of head protector at a minimum. Full sparring gear recommended.
Source(s): Ms Dresd.C.487 28v; Understanding Fencing

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Mathieu COTTEREAU
La Meute De NUADA
FFAMHE
France
Biography
I started the HEMA in 2011 and the wrestling in 2013. Mainly with 19th french and free wrestling. Now I work on the wrestling of the Codex Wallerstein with La Meute De NUADA. I prefer the wrestling than others disciplines because I think we are more easily in the spirit and the situation explained in the sources.
Workshop
Missing an assault
Because the adversary was good or because we were bad; It is clear that we too often try to return to the position we had before. Most often a guard. While it is precisely this behavior that gives openings to the opponent!
This attitude also prevents us from taking advantage of situations that are nevertheless presented in the sources with the techniques to adopt. This workshop aims to use the logic of the Wallerstein codex; after presentation of it; to work the continuity of the assault following a failure. The goal is to learn to take advantage of new situations; especially those seeming critical; to continue the attack and avoid giving opportunities to the opponent.
Level: Beginner
Required gear: Teeths protection
Source(s): Codex Wallerstein

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Cor KRONENBURG
Zwaard & Steen
HEMA
The Netherlands
Biography
First picked up a sword in 1996 and started training and teaching swordfighting. Now the founder and instructor at one of the biggest schools for HEMA in the Netherlands. Zwaard & Steen has been teaching HEMA for more than 15 years. We are still growing, exploring and discovering more of the Arts every day. We teach Liechtenauer’s tradition in longsword, dagger and ringen via Ringeck, Lignitzer, von Danzig and the rest of the German tradition.
“My background ranges from Judo and sport fencing to Westerns martial arts and horse riding. I’m also a bit of a re-enactor, including the fully armoured fighting part and I had a small career as a jouster. I believe HEMA is a 3D puzzle that you cannot comprehend in one view. It has different sides, which you all need to build the structure. Sides which support each other and, at the same time, can consist of a totally different tradition or Art. Still everything is connected, the more you do it, research and recreate it, the clearer the picture gets. Listen, observe and take action. Challenge yourself to step outside your usual viewpoints.”
Workshop
Würgegriff und Mordschlag
Not much is known about the German fencing master Hans Czynner. He probably lived in Passau, but for reasons unknown left his life’s work, the manuscript “Über die Fechtkunst und den Ringkampf” in Graz, Austria.
In this workshop we will explore some “stucken” of his treatise and mostly the longsword and Halb-schwert part of the manuscript. We will do the plays and the counters on that play. “Aber eynn Schtuck” and the “Eynn Pruch dorwyder”
To mimic the wearing of armor, please bring ALL your HEMA gear, I will bring some tape to make your fencing mask into a visored helmet with the right visibility and breathability 🙂
I myself will be wearing my armor, if you have 15th or 16th century full armor, please feel free to bring it and wear it.
Level: Open to all levels
Required gear: Longsword/Feder or similar
Mask, gorget and chest protector are mandatory! To mimic the feeling of wrestling and halb-schwert in armor, I suggest you put on as much as possible protective gear during the entire workshop.
Or bring your 15th-16th century full armor! 🙂
Source(s): Ms963 Universitätsbibliothek Graz
Hans Czynner, Fecht- und Ringlehre – Passau 1538

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Martin ENZI
Biography
Martin Enzi got in touch with martial art by practicing classic boxing and switched to HEMA in 2002. 2005 he started out as a trainer for long sword, messer and later on for peasant weapons and spear. In the same year he took part in the transcribtion of parts of Paulus Hector Mair (scythe, sickle and flail) for the Higgins Armory Museum. Even if training longsword and peasant weapons from PHM was always a topic, his main focus and deep passion lies on the messer according to cgm582/Johannes Leckuechner. Of course other sources, which are also talking a bit about messer (Talhofer, Wallerstein Pauernfeindt…), are going along with that. Next to HEMA he does showfighting since 16 years and is working occasionally as a stuntcoach and choreographer for Movies and TV.
Workshop
The underestimated second weapon in Messerfencing – the left hand Mostly the mainfocus in training messerfencing lays on bladecontrol, the feet and maybe bodymechanics.
But the timing of when to move the hand, how to move it and how to grip, push, strike, lever your opponent … is also important. Never forget your left hand is an additional weapon and dangerous from the fingertips to the elbow.
So topic is how to push, shove, hold, grip, lever, strike your oponent in the right moment in the right way, to finish him with your messer – if you like 😉
Level:
Required gear: Mask, tooth protection, messer or onehander (Steel / Aluminium – no Wooden or Plastic wasters)
Source(s):

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Ties KOOL
HVN – Historisch Vrijvechten Nederland
HEMA
The Netherlands
Biography
Ties started HEMA back in 2003. He is the head instructor of the HVN – Historisch Vrijvechten Nederland, which he started back in 2015. At the HVN Ties teaches mainly German longsword and Dutch Military Sabre, but also does workshops internationally in other disciplines like wrestling and dagger. Ties has fought and placed high in many tournaments with various weapons. He is known for his no-nonsense approach to fencing.
Workshop
How to close the gap between technical training and sparring
Often people struggle to apply their techniques in sparring. The gap between a controlled technical drill and free sparring is just to big for most. Whether it’s in a tournament or free sparring, they lack something. In this workshop we will work with drills meant to close that gap. A basic knowledge of longsword fencing is needed, but everybody will be working on their own level. Minimum gear is mask and gloves and preferably a throat protector. The more extra gear, the better though as you can up the intensity and speed of the drills.
Level: All
Required gear: ALongsword, mask & gloves is minimum. Full (upper) gear is preferred
Source(s):

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Sam Brennan BOOTH
The Renaissance Sword Club/London Historical Fencing Club
None
United Kingdom
Biography
Sam progressed from playing with sticks to Olympic fencing as a child, before becoming disillusioned with the nature of the sport. He dabbled with Muay Thai & Escrima, & briefly flirted with Capoeira, before his love of swords met his love of books in HEMA. He teaches rapier, with or without companion weapons, at the London Historical Fencing Club, &, despite their best efforts, he remains a member of the Renaissance Sword Club.
Workshop
Control of space, control of our opponent, & control of ourselves
The central theme of the class will be control. Control of space, control of our opponent, & control of ourselves. The class will draw techniques from the Livré des Leçons, attributed to Pedro de Heredia. We’ll work through a series of exercises, attempting to develop appropriate responses to attacks on the inside or the outside line. Throughout the class participants will be encouraged to reflect on the theme of control. The class will be open to all levels of experience, & all levels of attendee should find food for thought in the exercises.
Level: Beginner/Intermediate
Required gear: Minimal-gloves/mask/rapier
Recommended-fencing jacket/gorget
Source(s): Livré des Leçons

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Willeke SNIJDER
Bataille
HEMA bond Nederland
The Netherlands
Biography
Willeke started her HEMA adventure with Bataille in 2008 (Formerly known as Noorderwind) and trained in multiple weapons mainly to be used in shows and demonstrations for the public. During those trainings she was introduced to the sickle and it quickly became one of her favourite weapons. The last two years she has instructed sickle fighting according to Paulus Hector Mair on several occasions.
Workshop
Introduction to Sickle fighting by Paulus Hector Mair
The sickle is a humble farmer’s tool for cutting grass and grain but it can be repurposed as a fast and nasty weapon in the right hands. This was also described by Paulus Hector Mair in his manuscript “Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletic” which is the only known source of sickle fighting. The sixteen Latin plates from the Munich copy, and their translation, are the main source for this introduction to sickle.
Level: Beginner
Required gear: Required: Gloves, Fencing mask ( back of head protector is highly recommended.). Sickle (blunt), but we also bring spare sickles to borrow.
Source(s): Snijder_atelier

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Jens Peter KLEINAU
Zornhau and Fechtfabrik, Germany
DDHF, Deutschen Dachverband Historischer Fechter e.V.
Germany
Biography
Jens P. Kleinau (nom de plume “Johann Paulus Kal”) is the instructor for single handed weapons at Zornhau and Fechtfabrik Germany. His main studies since 1973 had been Fencing and Shotokan Karate, and today are Tai Chi, Wing Chun and of cause Historical Martial Arts. He has been a member of Zornhau since 2005, and in 2009 he joined a second HEMA club named Stahl auf Stahl, Frankfurt, Germany. In 2013 he founded the New Marxbrüder association in Frankfurt. Since 2015 he is teaching as well at the Fechtfabrik.
Jens P. transcribes, translates, and interprets the medieval and renaissance fighting manuals and publishes mostly at his well-known blog. He was awarded as Best Instructor by the HEMA Scholar Award 2017.
Workshop
Tanz den Liechtenauer – The Five Rules of Footwork
First of all, remember and know that the art of fencing is not found in jumping forward and hit with the longest reach, but in overcoming a superior opponent who does so. And you shall have the correct measurement in your fencing. You shall not step to further than that you can instantly correct by another step (forward or backwards if needed). When Liechtenauer speaks “WIltu kunst schawen sich link gen vnd recht mete hawen” he says that a skilful fencer does three strikes to the opponent together with each step, until he sees where to win the hit by his footwork. Liechtenauer says that no one should walk or step in the same direction as the strikes, but to the sides or circular around. And one should always prefer to gain the higher openings (and not the lower).
This sound all Liechtenauer-centric, but actually every master says the same. But it is not possible to quote them all in this small text. So bring any weapon you like as long as it is a safe HEMA simulator. This workshop teaches applied footwork to win fights, regardless of the weapon. Mixed weapon pairs are welcomed.
Level: Beginner up to Instructor
Required gear: Fencing Mask, any safe HEMA weapon simulator
Source(s): GMN 3227a, 15r-19v

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Shanee NISHRY
Hack & Slash
USA
Biography
Shanee leads Hack & Slash, a historical fencing study group in Silicon Valley, USA, affiliated with Academie Duello (Maestro Devon Boorman, CA).
She has competed in Longsword tournaments in Australia and the USA.
Shanee incorporates concepts from multiple fencing traditions, including German, Spanish, English, and Italian swordsmanship.
Her areas of interest are many and varied, including: sword physics and bind mechanics, pedagogy, body mechanics, mobility and injury prevention.
Workshop
Disarming the Buffalo Trap
As fencers, we fall into the buffalo trap whenever we attempt to solve a mechanical problem by exerting more physical force. This can impede our ability to move fluidly and respond dynamically. In this workshop, Shanee presents a method for disarming the buffalo trap – identifying when and why muscular tension appears, and how to apply mechanical principles of leverage and line control instead of muscular effort.
Part 1. Relaxed control: Towards effortless movement
Part 2. What makes it work? Analyze the underlying mechanics of a technique
Part 3. Understand and troubleshoot technique failure
Part 4. Respond without tension to changing speeds, pressure, and forces
Level: Any level
Required gear: Recommended protection: Fencing mask, gloves, gorget. Weapon: Instruction will use longsword, but applicable for any weapon.
Source(s):
‘The Buffalo Trap

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